Publication
25 January 2021
Thumbnail
Who suffers Most from Extreme Weather Events? Weather-related Loss Events in 2019 and 2000 to 2019

The Global Climate Risk Index 2021 analyses to what extent countries and regions have been affected by impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heat waves etc.). The most recent data available — for 2019 and from 2000 to 2019 — were taken into account. The countries and territories affected most in 2019 were Mozambique, Zimbabwe as well as the Bahamas. For the period from 2000 to 2019 Puerto Rico, Myanmar and Haiti rank highest.

Press Release
22 January 2021
Pressemitteilung
Mozambique, Zimbabwe and the Bahamas hit hardest by heavy storms and their direct implications in 2019 / Puerto Rico, Myanmar and Haiti with highest weather-related losses in the period from 2000 – 2019 / Climate Adaptation Summit starting today needs to discuss how to enhance support for vulnerable countries to deal with increasing climate impacts

Bonn/Berlin (25th Jan. 2021). Vulnerable people in developing countries suffer most from extreme weather events like storms, floods and heat waves, while the impacts of climate change are visible around the globe. Being the deadliest and costliest tropical cyclone in the South-West Indian Ocean, tropical Cyclone Idai was labelled “one of the worst weather-related catastrophes in the history of Africa” by UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

Publication
20 January 2021
Thumbnail
How the 2021 European Year of Rail can support the European Green Deal and a sustainable recovery

The European Union has set itself the target to become climate neutral by 2050. Rail could play a key role in the future transport system because it is clean, safe and reliable, and it could become a symbol for the European Green Deal. A strengthened European rail system could (1) better connect people and businesses in Europe, (2) reduce transport emissions by creating alternative options to road transport and aviation, and (3) give a green boost to the European economy post-Covid-19.

Publication
15 January 2021
Thumbnail

For months, there has been an intensive and controversial debate in Germany on a Human Rights Due Diligence Regulation (so called supply chain law). Recently, a new proposal has been under discussion - a law for a supply chain register. Now that the debate on the supply chain register is public and this proposal has also been submitted to EU Justice Commissioner Reynders, Germanwatch, Greenpeace and INKOTA hereby publicly present their central points of criticism of the supply chain register.

Blogpost
14 January 2021
Blogbeitrag: Wasserstoff 2021-01-15

The European Commission is focusing on hydrogen from renewable electricity, to accelerate the decarbonization of the various sectors and to achieve climate neutrality in 2050. What does this mean for the future of energy imports from Russia, currently the largest supplier of natural gas to the European Union? A chance, the authors of this background article find, and elaborate on challenges and first steps on how to leverage this opportunity.

Blogpost
21 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint Blog Series of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch discussing the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.
The question of what India's recovery strategy - and international support - will look like will create central path dependencies. Especially now, in the new challenge of the Corona crisis, India needs reliable and strong partners such as Germany and the EU to enter into more sustainable pathway through the recovery packages. Strategies for green and resilient recovery and NDC implementation and increase go hand in hand.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blogs of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

As of 2019, in addition to ensuring food security, agriculture has contributed 15.9% to the Indian GDP and employed 42.3% of its population. Despite its high reliance on monsoons, agriculture continues to be the largest provider of livelihoods in rural India. India is among the top three producers of wheat, pulses, cotton, rice, fruits, vegetables and peanuts in the world. This translates to about USD 38.5 billion worth of agricultural and processed foods export to over 200 countries – making up for 12.6% of Indian exports.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blog of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blog of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.

Blogpost
18 December 2020
Blogpost
Joint blogs of Vasudha Foundation and Germanwatch on the design of Green & Resilient Recovery in India through renewable energy development and systemic resilience building.

Against the background of the social, economic and political COVID-19 effects on India, all business-as-usual scenarios for economic development and emission trends of Indian and resilient society building are outdated. There is both the possibility of an accelerated structural change to renewable energy, away from fossil fuels and combustion engines and the danger of a massive rebound effect for the emissions path. The same width of possibilities exists between society-wide resilience building and intensified inequality.