G20 Presidency in 2022

Logo of the Indonesian G20 presidency

 

Indonesia will hold the G20 Presidency this year. Along with international partner organisations, Germanwatch will be assisting the dialogue among civil society actors (“Track 2 Dialogue”) and building a bridge between them and political decision-makers in order to strengthen cooperation between the heads of state and government within G20. The main emphasis will thereby be on climate, just energy transition, and other related energy policies.

News about the G20

Publication
20 October 2022
Comparing G20 Climate Action towards Net Zero - The Highlights
The G20 countries have a special role to combat climate change - they are responsible for a majority of global emissions. This year’s Climate Transparency Report shows that G20 members are undermining climate efforts and fossil fuel production subsidies surge to highest levels ever in 2021.
Publication
04 October 2022

At the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow (COP26), several multilateral initiatives were launched that manifest the ongoing development of a more polycentric and complex international climate governance. Read more about how they can potentially close the 2030 ambition gap and implement climate action more quickly in our policy brief.

Publication
04 October 2022

At the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow (COP26), several multilateral initiatives were launched. In this fact sheet, we took a closer look at the Beyond Oil and Gas Alliance (BOGA) and its potential to close the 2030 ambition gap and implement climate action more quickly.

Publication
04 October 2022

At the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow (COP26), several multilateral initiatives were launched. In this fact sheet, we took a closer look at the Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forests and Land-Use (GDFLU) and its potential to close the 2030 ambition gap and implement climate action more quickly.

Publication
04 October 2022

At the UN Climate Conference in Glasgow (COP26), several multilateral initiatives were launched. In this fact sheet, we took a closer look at the Global Methane Pledge (GMP) and its potential to close the 2030 ambition gap and implement climate action more quickly.

Publication
12 August 2022
Lessons Learnt for Civil Society Organisations (CSO)

The Just Energy Transition Partnership (JETP), announced last year with South Africa, aims to reduce emissions in the energy sector and accelerate the coal phase-out process. The partnership, first announced in COP26 with the promised value of 8.5$ billion, was then followed by a G7 announcement for a similar partnership in India, Indonesia, Senegal, and Vietnam. As an important thread in the social fabric of many countries, it is crucial for CSOs to be involved in providing input and monitoring the partnership process, especially as Indonesia and India are preparing their own JETP.

Publication
14 October 2021
Comparing G20 Climate Action towards Net Zero - The Highlights

The G20 countries have a special role to combat climate change - they are responsible for a majority of global emissions. This year’s Climate Transparency Report shows that the efforts of the G20 countries are currently insufficient to limit climate change to the 1.5°C agreed in the Paris Agreement. After a short period of decline, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, emissions are rebounding across the G20. However, a positive development is that the expansion of Renewable Energy capacities are rising.

Publication
18 November 2020
The "Climate Transparency Report" 2020 reviews the climate policy of the G20 members

The G20 countries are responsible for around 75% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Last year, energy-related CO2 emissions in the G20 fell slightly for the first time, by 0.1% after a rise of 1.9% in 2018, without an economic crisis as a trigger. The key to these initial successes is the continuing boom in renewable energies.

Publication
11 November 2019
The Brown to Green Report 2019 takes stock of the G20 countries’ climate action.
The G20 countries are responsible for around 80 % of global greenhouse gas emissions, and 85 % of global GDP. In the G20 countries, around 70 % of climate impacts could be avoided by limiting global warming to 1.5°C instead of 3°C. The G20 have a political responsibility as well as economic interest and capability to move the world towards a 1.5°C compatible pathway.
Press Release
11 November 2019
Review of climate action finds G20 not on track to meet Paris goals, but positive trends in some countries

Carbon emissions from the world’s 20 biggest economies are rising. None of the G20 countries have plans that will put them on track to limit global warming to 1.5°C, despite the fact that most are technically capable and have economic incentives. To keep the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C goal within reach, G20 countries will have to increase their 2030 emission targets by 2020 and significantly scale up mitigation, adaptation and finance over the next decade.